Minecraft then and now…

While it might not have been as technologically advanced, older generations  had a similar tool at their disposal: Legos. While not the most exciting thing, being simple, plastic coloured blocks, Legos provided countless hours of entertainment and creativity to an innumerable number of children. Minecraft shares this quality. The graphics are not the best, the gameplay has no set rules or missions to follow, and nothing but your own mind to create with. It is your own creativity and ambition that makes the game fun – if you do not have the drive, it can just as boring as stacking Lego pieces on top of one another to knock it down, pack it away and walk off. Children might not see the same appeal in Lego, but Minecraft offers them that experience on a platform they are comfortable with and know how to use. It gives them the chance to socialize with people, be a part of a project and learn the importance of working in a team without running the risk of standing on the pieces afterwards and destroying them. There is also no risk of standing on a Minecraft creation late at night as you are navigating around in the dark.

It is good for children to see that the world is evolving and, while aids were available to their parents of a similar nature, those aids are growing and more advanced, and more is becoming possible by the day. It gives them a precedent for the future and allows them to see that change and creativity can make a difference to everyday life. Just because their parents played with pieces of plastic does not mean that they cannot get the same benefits from something that is more technically advanced.